Exploring Compound Sentences

You might think I'm crazy, but I actually enjoy teaching about compound and complex sentences! I recently wrote a blog post that focuses on complex sentences at my collaborative blog, Upper Elementary Snapshots. (You can read that post by clicking HERE.) Therefore, I decided to write a related blog post, but concentrate on compound sentences!

An Anchor Chart

Compound Sentences Anchor Chart! This blog post also features a FREE printable where students write their own compound sentences.

When I use this anchor chart, I stress two things: the FANBOYS acronym and the use of the comma. Especially when working with older students, I point out that a comma is only used when a coordinating conjunction joins together two independent clauses. No comma is needed when a coordinating conjunction simply joins too words or two phrases. For example:

Max washed and dried all of the dishes.
I want to play soccer or kickball.  
She invited everyone to the party but me.
Grace is confident yet humble.
(No comma is needed because words are being joined, not independent clauses.)


Mom is making me clean my closet and organize my drawers.
Set the books on the table or on the bookshelf.
Joe is extremely talented yet somewhat arrogant.
(No comma is needed because phrases are being joined, not independent clauses.)


A FREE Activity

After going through the anchor chart, you can have students write their own compound sentences on this fan. If you want, you can have students make a craftivity out of it. After students write their sentences and you check them over, they can color the fans, cut them out, and glue them to a sheet of construction paper. Another option is to have students cut out the fans and glue it into an interactive language notebook. To download these free printables, click HERE. 

FREE Coordinating Conjunctions Craftivity- Help students remember the coordinating conjunctions by using the FANBOYS acronym. FREE Compound Sentences Craftivity- Help students remember the coordinating conjunctions by using the FANBOYS acronym.
                                 Front of Project                         Back of Project

If you are looking for additional resources for teaching about compound and complex sentences to your upper elementary students, feel free to check out the following resource. I have placed my bundle image here, but all of these items are also available for individual purchase in my TpT store.


Simple, Compound, and Complex Sentences Activities- a PowerPoint, task cards, a game, a craftivity, and more!

Thanks for stopping by!

Deb

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