Punctuating Titles: An Anchor Chart and a FREEBIE

Do you teach students how to punctuate titles? It's a 5th grade standard (L.5.2.d), but in the past, I definitely touched on the more common rules (books, chapters, poems, songs, magazines, & articles) when I taught fourth grade, as well.

Today I am going to show you the anchor chart I created to address this standard. Before class, I will create the base of the anchor chart- a simple T-chart. I will be creating most of the anchor chart during class with students. (I used clip art images that are free on TPT, just in case you want to replicate this anchor chart. To obtain the pie clip art, visit Kari Bolt's store. To download the free computer and pencil clip art, visit Tim van de Vall's store.)
Punctuating Titles Anchor Chart | Part of a free lesson that includes a free sorting activity! Use this anchor chart activity and freebie to teach your students about when to underline titles, when to italicize titles, and when to place titles inside quotation marks.

Once class begins, I will ask my students to help me fill in the anchor chart. First, I will tell my students that when it comes to punctuating titles, there is a guiding question they can ask themselves that will help them punctuate the majority of titles: Is this a WHOLE literary work, or is this a PART of a literary work? I'll explain that whole, complete literary works are underlined, while partial literary works are placed inside quotation marks. Next, I'll list associated pairs (book and chapter, for example), and I'll have students tell me in which column each literary piece should be written.
Punctuating Titles Anchor Chart | Part of a free lesson that includes a free sorting activity! Use this anchor chart activity and freebie to teach your students about when to underline titles, when to italicize titles, and when to place titles inside quotation marks.

After we've listed all of the titles that follow the whole vs. parts guideline, I will tell my students that there are a few items that need to be added to the column of titles that need to be underlined. After switching to a green marker, I will add the additional four items to the bottom of that column. Likewise, I will add a couple items to the bottom of the quotation mark list. These items written in green don't really follow the whole vs. parts rule, and simply need to be memorized.

To complete the anchor chart, I will tell my students that there is one more important rule they need to remember, and it's related to the two images at the bottom of the anchor chart. After allowing 1 or 2 students to make a guess, I will jot the final rule on the anchor chart. When the anchor chart is complete, it will look like this:
Punctuating Titles Anchor Chart | Part of a free lesson that includes a free sorting activity! Use this anchor chart activity and freebie to teach your students about when to underline titles, when to italicize titles, and when to place titles inside quotation marks.

If you don't have time to make the anchor chart, you might want to consider purchasing my Punctuating Titles PowerPoint. Slides 4 through 16 take the students through a similar part vs. whole exercise. It also makes the same point about italicizing instead of underlining when you are using a keyboard. Furthermore, it concludes with 17 practice sentences.
Punctuating Titles PowerPoint! This PowerPoint teaches students when to underline, when to italicize, and when to use quotation mark. It includes a companion handout!

Whether you choose to use the anchor chart or the PowerPoint, be sure to download this FREE PRINTABLE by clicking on the image below! I plan to use it as a quick exit ticket. This sorting activity will allow you to check for understanding.
Punctuating Titles FREEBIE- Grab this sorting activity that can be used as an exit ticket! Students differentiate between when to underline/italicize titles, and when to put titles in quotation marks.

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Punctuating Titles Free Lesson| This lesson includes an anchor chart idea and a free sorting activity! Use this anchor chart activity and freebie to teach your students about when to underline titles, when to italicize titles, and when to place titles inside quotation marks.


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