A FREE Text Evidence Lesson!

Teaching students to find text evidence to support their answers is an important reading strategy and test taking strategy. This post contains a FREE text evidence lesson!  It includes text evidence sentence starters, a free reading passage, and other text evidence activities.
Text Evidence... it's of huge importance in the upper elementary grades! After all, it's the first standard listed for Reading: Literature and Reading: Informational Text in grades 3, 4, and 5. I have copied each grade level's related standard below so that you can see how it progresses as students advance through the grade levels.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.1 and RI.3.1- Ask and answer questions to demonstrate  understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as a basis for answers.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.1 and RI.4.1- Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 

 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.5.1 and RI.5.1- Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.


As you can see, in 4th and 5th grades, students are expected to be able to answer text questions by pointing to a section of the text...
    1.)  that provides the exact  answer
and 
    2.)  that helps them to infer  an answer.

This sounds a bit confusing, but it is quite simple to teach students this concept by showing them a few passages like the one below. I would place this passage under my document camera, read the passage with my students, and label the questions as follows:
You can download this passage by clicking HERE.
Obviously, the first answer is right there in the second paragraph... students can point directly to the words "roller coaster" to prove their answer. However, to answer the second and third questions correctly, the students must use their inferencing skills.

After this brief discussion, I would pass out the bookmark papers to my students, and tell them that the two types of questions require slightly different sentence starters. 
Download these bookmarks by clicking HERE.
The set of five sentence starters on the left is useful when the answer is stated explicitly in the text. The set of five sentence starters displayed on the right are especially useful when the students have to infer in order to reach the answer, because the answer is not explicitly stated. 

After working together to write answers to the questions above by using the sentence starters on the bookmarks, I would have students cut around the outside box and then fold it in half to create a two-sided bookmark, which can now be used as a reference tool throughout your text evidence unit, and throughout the school year.

In case you are interested, I have created a number of Text Evidence teaching resources that are available in my TpT store.  Just click on the images to take a closer look at them!

Teaching students to find text evidence to support their answers is an important reading strategy and test taking strategy. This post contains a FREE text evidence lesson!  It includes text evidence sentence starters, a free reading passage, and other text evidence activities.

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Text-Evidence-PowerPoint-2132106

 Text Evidence Passages

Thank you for stopping by!

4 comments:

  1. Love the bookmarks. Just saved this on my informational text Pinterest board.

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  2. This is a great resource! Thank you so much!!

    -Lisa

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  3. I love it too. Some students just need extra practice citing evidence and using their inference skills. It is so nice to find just what I need instead of creating it myself. Thanks!

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  4. Thanks, Deb. I really like your sentence starters, and I think they'll work well for students. Often I see sentence starters that kids find difficult to complete using proper sentence structure. I'm replacing a few on my anchor chart with several of yours!

    ReplyDelete