Anchors Away Monday: S'more Inferences... with a freebie!

If you are teaching students about making inferences, try the s'more analogy. This blog post contains an inference anchor chart that explains the analogy.

Those of you who have been following me for a while already know that I believe it is vital to help students build connections in their brain that they can draw on in the future.  One way I do this is by linking real objects to abstract standards... the components of a S'more to the process of making an inference, for example!

When I created this inference anchor chart to use with students, I prepared most of the anchor chart prior to the beginning of class.  I did NOT, however, write on the second set of S'more ingredients (at the bottom of the chart).  Instead, we read the passage and discussed together what should be written on the bottom S'more pieces.  I wrote on them as we discussed the passage.
Inference Anchor Chart using the Smore analogy!

 I continue the lesson (and deepen the connection) by having students create a S'more inference themselves! Click HERE if you want to download this FREE passage and practice activity:
Teaching about making inferences while reading? Check out this anchor chart and FREE inference activity for upper elementary students! This blog post contains a free passage and instructions which will allow your students to make their own s'more inference!

I cut the pieces my students will need before class:
Teaching about making inferences while reading? Check out this anchor chart and FREE inference activity for upper elementary students! This blog post contains a free passage and instructions which will allow your students to make their own s'more inference!

After completing the anchor chart, the lesson proceeds like this:
Teaching about making inferences while reading? Check out this anchor chart and FREE inference activity for upper elementary students! This blog post contains a free passage and instructions which will allow your students to make their own s'more inference!
Students read the passage and complete the worksheet.
I have students create the S'more using question #3 on the worksheet.

Teaching about making inferences while reading? Check out this anchor chart and FREE inference activity for upper elementary students! This blog post contains a free passage and instructions which will allow your students to make their own s'more inference!
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Teaching about making inferences while reading? Check out this anchor chart and FREE inference activity for upper elementary students! This blog post contains a free passage and instructions which will allow your students to make their own s'more inference!

Teaching about making inferences while reading? Check out this anchor chart and FREE inference activity for upper elementary students! This blog post contains a free passage and instructions which will allow your students to make their own s'more inference!

Teaching about making inferences while reading? Check out this anchor chart and FREE inference activity for upper elementary students! This blog post contains a free passage and instructions which will allow your students to make their own s'more inference!

Students are eager to show off their S'more inference. Beware, though, this activity makes everyone crave a s'more. Often I bring the ingredients to class, and we all enjoy an unmelted s'more after we finish the activity. It's not quite as tasty as the real thing, but it's still fun to enjoy a snack! :)

This anchor chart and free activity is actually a "spin-off" of one of my favorite craftivities, My Let's Make S'more Inferences Craftivity.



3 comments:

  1. I love the s'more anchor chart and activity! Very fun and creative! Did you get my email/comment about the Father's Day craftivity?

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  2. You always create the CUTEST anchor charts! I've started pinning them all to use on my Smartboard.

    Thank you for the glowing introduction, my sweet bloggy friend! I really do hope that we are able to meet in person someday... SOON!

    Angela

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  3. What a great visual way to teach a complex concept! I have used s'mores to teach process writing before. We can't have food in my current school, but in the past I have used chocolate covered graham crackers and marshmallow fluff. Again, not as good as a real s'more, but not bad! Thanks for the great lesson!

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