Lailah's Lunchbox: A Mentor Text Activity that Focuses on Asking Higher-Level Questions


Lailah's Lunchbox: A Ramadan Story- This book is featured as a mentor text activity for teaching students how to ask higher-level questions. Includes a FREE follow-up worksheet!

Welcome to our Celebrating Diversity mentor text link-up! The book I'm choosing to feature is Lailah's Lunchbox: A Ramadan Story by Reem Faruqi. This is a powerful read-aloud that will touch everyone in your classroom. Your Muslim students will be excited to find a proud, strong Muslim main character that may be facing difficult situations similar to the ones they face on a daily basis. Furthermore, your non-Muslim students will connect with a character much like themselves, as well, who worries about her classmates' and teacher's opinion of her. The author of this book explains the tradition of fasting during Ramadan in a sensitive, positive manner that is perfect for the upper elementary classroom. (Full disclosure: This post contains affiliate links.)

Lailah's Lunchbox: A Ramadan Story- This book is featured as a mentor text activity for teaching students how to ask higher-level questions. Includes a FREE follow-up worksheet!


A quick summary: The book begins the day before Ramadan, when Lailah hangs up her lunchbox because she won't be needing it for the next month. Lailah and her mother are both thrilled and proud that she has reached this special milestone in her life. However, the next day her excitement quickly turns to anxiety, as she worries about what exactly will happen during lunchtime when she is the only student who doesn't eat lunch. She finds herself wishing she could return to Abu Dhabi, her old home where her best friends would also be fasting for Ramadan. When lunchtime arrives, Lailah is still too scared to give her teacher the note her mother wrote, and she heads to the lunchroom with her classmates. A few thoughtful classmates volunteer to share their lunches with Lailah, but she is too nervous to explain why she doesn't accept their offer. Finally, she sneaks out of the cafeteria and heads to the library, where she explains everything to the librarian. Mrs. Carman encourages Lailah to write down what she is feeling, and Lailah proceeds to write a letter to her classroom teacher, along with a poem about Ramadan. She drops it on her teacher's desk before she leaves school. The next day, Lailah's anxiety returns. However, her teacher hands her a message that invites her to visit the library instead of sitting in the cafeteria during lunchtime throughout Ramadan. Her teacher also invites Lailah to share her poem with the class later that day. Lailah is relieved that she doesn't have to endure lunchtime in the cafeteria, and she is excited about sharing her poem with her classmates.

Lailah's Lunchbox: A Ramadan Story- This multicultural book is featured as a mentor text activity for teaching students how to ask higher-level questions. Includes a FREE follow-up worksheet!

Lailah's Lunchbox: A Ramadan Story- This multicultural book is featured as a mentor text activity for teaching students how to ask higher-level questions. Includes a FREE follow-up worksheet!

Focus Skill: Asking Higher-Level Questions

Teachers know that asking higher-level questions is extremely important. When students are required to answer open-ended questions related to the books they are reading, they achieve a deeper understanding that results in advanced cognitive and emotional responses. Furthermore, I have found that it is helpful for students to understand the differences between lower-level questions and higher-level questions. Not only does this knowledge prepare students for when they are asked a higher-level question, but it also prepares them to independently participate in book clubs and literature circles in a way that has meaningful results.

Lailah's Lunchbox: A Ramadan Story- This multicultural book is featured as a mentor text activity for teaching students how to ask higher-level questions. Includes a FREE follow-up worksheet!


Feel free to download the free worksheet that I created to accompany Lailah's Lunchbox. First, I intend to read aloud the book for pure enjoyment. When I finish the book, I will say something like "Wow, this book has given me a lot to think about. When I read books like these, I like to discuss it with others to find out if they feel the same way I do, or if they feel differently. In order to have a book discussion, though, it is helpful to plan the questions you want to ask."

Then, I will distribute the worksheet and tell students that we are going to review a list of questions that were written about the book we just read together. After discussing the content in the top two boxes, I will ask students to consider which questions are most conducive to a book discussion (Higher-level questions are more helpful because they allow for more discussion.) Next, I will give students about 5 minutes to complete the worksheet. When everyone has finished, we will go through the questions together, labeling them as higher-level or lower-level questions. Finally, I will divide the students into small groups and have them share the questions and answers they wrote for the final two items on the worksheet.

Thank you for stopping by today! Be sure to hop around and visit my friends' blogs and check out the other diverse books shared in this mentor text link up!





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Lailah's Lunchbox: A Ramadan Story- This multicultural book is featured as a mentor text activity for teaching students how to ask higher-level questions. Includes a FREE follow-up worksheet!

Recognizing and Correcting Sentence Fragments and Run-ons


Being able to write a complete sentence is the foundation upon which all writing skills are built. It sounds simple enough, right? As we teachers know, however, some students struggle with forming a complete sentence, even in the upper elementary grades. If they make it too short and omit the all-important subject, they're left with a fragment. If they string too many ideas together and make it too long, they're left with a run-on sentence. To quote Goldilocks, it needs to be "just right". Today I'm going to share a couple tips with you that you can use as you teach your students how to recognize and revise fragments and run-on sentences.

Teaching students to recognize fragments and run-ons in their writing can be difficult.  This blog post features a few tips and a FREE writing minilesson for upper elementary classrooms!

Tip #1: Emphasize that fragments and run-ons are usually overlooked when speaking, but not when writing.

First, I believe it's critical to point out to students that when we speak, we often use fragments and run-ons. In contrast, fragments and run-ons are taboo when it comes to writing. Many students notice this difference in expectations on their own, but some students benefit greatly from having this difference explicitly brought to their attention. Consider these conversations that highlight how we frequently use fragments and run-ons when we engage in casual conversation.

Mom: What did you do at basketball practice tonight?
Child: Learned a new play and practiced free throws.

Dad: It's your birthday! What's the first thing you want to do?
Child: Open presents!

Mom: How was Field Day?
Child: It was so fun! Sam and I were partners for the three-legged race, but I am so tall and Sam is so short that we couldn't seem to get a good rhythm going and we fell at least five times but we didn't care we just laughed the entire time.

The answers given by each child are acceptable when the child speaks. However, those same answers would be considered poorly-formed sentences if they were written as they were spoken.

I created a free handout you can use as you explain this difference to students. You can place the poster below the document camera, project it onto a screen, and work through the sentences together. Click on the photo to download it.

Teaching students to recognize fragments and run-ons in their writing can be difficult.  This blog post features a few tips and a FREE writing minilesson for upper elementary classrooms!


Tip #2: Procure student writing samples.

Do you save samples of students' writing throughout the year to use as models for next year's students? If you are like me, your answer is "no".  However, I encourage you to start saving those student writing samples. In the book, Embedded Formative Assessment, Dylan Wiliam lists many reasons why it's helpful to save writing samples that are both strong and weak, and then use them as teaching tools with future students.

If you are interested in learning more, you should definitely read Wiliam's entire book, but I want to share one quote from Chapter 3. He writes "Some teachers wonder why a class should spend time looking at other students' work when they could be doing their own work, but as many teachers have discovered, students are much better at spotting errors and weaknesses in the work of others than they are in their own. Once students have pointed out such errors or weaknesses, they are more likely to avoid repeating them in their own work."

I must admit, I have thought about saving student samples many times, but I've never actually done it. Just imagine, though... when you're teaching about sentence fragments and run-on sentences, wouldn't it be so handy to be able to pull out of your filing cabinet a few rough drafts written by previous students, project one on the screen, and have your students help you revise the sentence fragments?

I think I know what you're thinking... that's all well and good for next year, but what about this year? One solution is to ask another teacher (perhaps from a different grade level or from a different school just to ensure the writer remains anonymous) if he or she would photocopy a few of his/her student's rough drafts that contain fragments and/or run-ons. Then, you can lead your students in revising that student's paragraph. Another solution is to write a mock student writing sample yourself. A final solution is to use one of the worksheets in my Fragments and Run-ons Bundle. Click on the image below to check it out!

Teach students to recognize and correct fragments and run-on sentences in their writing!

Thanks for stopping by today! Have a great day!



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Teaching students to recognize fragments and run-ons in their writing can be difficult.  This blog post features a few tips and a FREE writing minilesson for upper elementary classrooms!




Improving Reading Fluency with Partner Plays

It is often said that fluency is the bridge between word recognition and reading comprehension. I love the image that statement creates in my mind. I can picture a struggling reader take that first tentative step across the middle of the bridge by experimenting with aspects of fluency, like expression and phrasing. With each repeated reading and fluency activity, the reader reads more smoothly and expressively. Eventually, as the reader gains confidence in his or her ability to read fluently, his or her steps toward reading comprehension become more assured and certain.

The time it takes students to cross the "fluency bridge" varies significantly. Some students exhibit reading fluency almost immediately upon learning to read. Others improve steadily with regular practice. And some students struggle to acquire reading fluency. Their steps may be much smaller than their peers, but with repeated readings that target fluency, they will cross the bridge.

Luckily for us teachers, there are plenty of fluency activities to choose from: reading poetry, reading with audio recordings, choral reading, echo reading, and paired reading are just a few. Personally, my favorite is paired reading. After all, students are often begging to work with partners! Plus, if you plan your partnerships in a purposeful way so that a student who exhibits reading fluency is paired with a student who needs improvement in the area of fluency, that struggling reader will be exposed to fluent reading in a very natural way.

Fluency is said to be the bridge between word recognition and reading comprehension. Learn about my partner play scripts that provide a fun and engaging way to focus on reading fluency. Plus, they feature a reading comprehension component, as well! These scripts are designed to be used in 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade reading classrooms.
This photo features my Growth Mindset set of partner plays.

A few years ago, I started to create partner plays for the 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade students I was working with. My primary purpose for creating the partner plays was to target reading fluency. When I introduced my students to the plays, I was thrilled to find out that they LOVED the scripts. They were constantly imploring me to write more and more scripts, which I did. Eventually, I decided that I wanted to add a comprehension component to each script. After students read a script, they answer the comprehension questions that accompany it.

Fluency is said to be the bridge between word recognition and reading comprehension. Learn about my partner play scripts that provide a fun and engaging way to focus on reading fluency. Plus, they feature a reading comprehension component, as well! These scripts are designed to be used in 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade reading classrooms.
Comprehension questions accompany each script.

Over the years, I've written nearly 100 sets of scripts! I'm including links to a small handful of scripts below, but if you'd like to see the complete list of plays available just click HERE.

CLICK ON EACH BUTTON TO PREVIEW EACH SET OF SCRIPTS!

PARTNER PLAY BUNDLES

  Fluency is said to be the bridge between word recognition and reading comprehension. Learn about my partner play scripts that provide a fun and engaging way to focus on reading fluency. Plus, they feature a reading comprehension component, as well! These scripts are designed to be used in 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade reading classrooms.  Fluency is said to be the bridge between word recognition and reading comprehension. Learn about my partner play scripts that provide a fun and engaging way to focus on reading fluency. Plus, they feature a reading comprehension component, as well! These scripts are designed to be used in 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade reading classrooms.

Fluency is said to be the bridge between word recognition and reading comprehension. Learn about my partner play scripts that provide a fun and engaging way to focus on reading fluency. Plus, they feature a reading comprehension component, as well! These scripts are designed to be used in 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade reading classrooms.  Fluency is said to be the bridge between word recognition and reading comprehension. Learn about my partner play scripts that provide a fun and engaging way to focus on reading fluency. Plus, they feature a reading comprehension component, as well! These scripts are designed to be used in 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade reading classrooms.  Fluency is said to be the bridge between word recognition and reading comprehension. Learn about my partner play scripts that provide a fun and engaging way to focus on reading fluency. Plus, they feature a reading comprehension component, as well! These scripts are designed to be used in 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade reading classrooms.



Each set of scripts can also be purchased individually. Click on the buttons below to preview individual sets of partner play scripts.

HOLIDAY PARTNER PLAYS




READING SKILLS PARTNER PLAYS


SCIENCE PARTNER PLAYS



READ WHAT OTHER TEACHERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THESE PARTNER PLAYS!

Fluency is said to be the bridge between word recognition and reading comprehension. Learn about my partner play scripts that provide a fun and engaging way to focus on reading fluency. Plus, they feature a reading comprehension component, as well! These scripts are designed to be used in 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade reading classrooms.


Fluency is said to be the bridge between word recognition and reading comprehension. Learn about my partner play scripts that provide a fun and engaging way to focus on reading fluency. Plus, they feature a reading comprehension component, as well! These scripts are designed to be used in 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade reading classrooms.


Fluency is said to be the bridge between word recognition and reading comprehension. Learn about my partner play scripts that provide a fun and engaging way to focus on reading fluency. Plus, they feature a reading comprehension component, as well! These scripts are designed to be used in 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade reading classrooms.


Fluency is said to be the bridge between word recognition and reading comprehension. Learn about my partner play scripts that provide a fun and engaging way to focus on reading fluency. Plus, they feature a reading comprehension component, as well! These scripts are designed to be used in 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade reading classrooms.

Finally, you might want to check out my four free partner play scripts and my free fluency posters. You will find links to those items by clicking on this blog post.




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Fluency is said to be the bridge between word recognition and reading comprehension. Learn about my partner play scripts that provide a fun and engaging way to focus on reading fluency. Plus, they feature a reading comprehension component, as well! These scripts are designed to be used in 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade reading classrooms.

Targeting Reading Skills with Small Group Instruction

Teachers who implement small group instruction activities understand the numerous benefits associated with working with a limited number of students. A few of the benefits include:

  • a reduced student-teacher ratio. Rather than trying to simultaneously meet the various needs of 30-some students at once, the teacher can focus on breaking down concepts based on the needs of 2-6 students.
  • targeted skill instruction. When a handful of students who are struggling with a certain skill are pulled aside, the teacher can provide in-depth instruction related to that particular skill.
  • individualized learning. When a teacher is focused on the needs of a small handful of students at one time, he or she can easily assess which aspects of a skill have been mastered, and which aspects will require additional learning opportunities and supports in order to eventually reach a level of mastery.
  • increased student engagement. In a large group setting, there will always be students who are able to mask their true understanding of a skill by "flying under the radar". However, when students are engaged in small group instruction, they are required to be actively involved in each lesson. Furthermore, students are often willing to ask more questions in order to clarify a confusing concept in a small group setting.
During my 16-year teaching career, I have often alternated between teaching large groups of students in a regular classroom setting, and teaching small groups of students in a smaller setting, often around a kidney-shaped reading table. Because of these varied experiences, I have found that very different resources are especially conducive to the very different settings. Whereas I often create PowerPoints to use in a large group setting, I use very targeted materials in small group settings.

Recently, I decided to spend a large chunk of time creating ELA resources that were specifically designed to be used in a small group setting. I named this line of resources "targeted tri-folds" because I tried very hard to zero in on isolated skills related to each topic. While creating each set, I envisioned the various students I worked with over the years, and considered the concepts they struggled with most as we covered each topic.

Small group instruction and targeted intervention is known to improve reading comprehension skills. Learn about my Targeted Tri-folds designed for upper elementary students and why teachers love it. These trifolds target ten different reading skills, including main idea, context clues, making inferences, author's purpose, and much, much more! Reading Comprehension

Each topic contains four separate booklets, as shown below:
Small group instruction and targeted intervention is known to improve reading comprehension skills. Learn about my Targeted Tri-folds designed for upper elementary students and why teachers love it. These trifolds target ten different reading skills, including main idea, context clues, making inferences, author's purpose, and much, much more! Reading Comprehension


CLICK ON EACH INDIVIDUAL SKILL TO VIEW THE MATCHING SET OF TARGETED TRI-FOLDS!

 

READ WHAT TEACHERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THESE TRI-FOLDS!

Small group instruction and targeted intervention is known to improve reading comprehension skills. Learn about my Targeted Tri-folds designed for upper elementary students and why teachers love it. These trifolds target ten different reading skills, including main idea, context clues, making inferences, author's purpose, and much, much more! Reading Comprehension

Small group instruction and targeted intervention is known to improve reading comprehension skills. Learn about my Targeted Tri-folds designed for upper elementary students and why teachers love it. These trifolds target ten different reading skills, including main idea, context clues, making inferences, author's purpose, and much, much more! Reading Comprehension

Small group instruction and targeted intervention is known to improve reading comprehension skills. Learn about my Targeted Tri-folds designed for upper elementary students and why teachers love it. These trifolds target ten different reading skills, including main idea, context clues, making inferences, author's purpose, and much, much more! Reading Comprehension

Small group instruction and targeted intervention is known to improve reading comprehension skills. Learn about my Targeted Tri-folds designed for upper elementary students and why teachers love it. These trifolds target ten different reading skills, including main idea, context clues, making inferences, author's purpose, and much, much more! Reading Comprehension

Small group instruction and targeted intervention is known to improve reading comprehension skills. Learn about my Targeted Tri-folds designed for upper elementary students and why teachers love it. These trifolds target ten different reading skills, including main idea, context clues, making inferences, author's purpose, and much, much more! Reading Comprehension



Exploring Compound Sentences

You might think I'm crazy, but I actually enjoy teaching about compound and complex sentences! I recently wrote a blog post that focuses on complex sentences at my collaborative blog, Upper Elementary Snapshots. (You can read that post by clicking HERE.) Therefore, I decided to write a related blog post, but concentrate on compound sentences!

An Anchor Chart

Compound Sentences Anchor Chart! This blog post also features a FREE printable where students write their own compound sentences.

When I use this anchor chart, I stress two things: the FANBOYS acronym and the use of the comma. Especially when working with older students, I point out that a comma is only used when a coordinating conjunction joins together two independent clauses. No comma is needed when a coordinating conjunction simply joins too words or two phrases. For example:

Max washed and dried all of the dishes.
I want to play soccer or kickball.  
She invited everyone to the party but me.
Grace is confident yet humble.
(No comma is needed because words are being joined, not independent clauses.)


Mom is making me clean my closet and organize my drawers.
Set the books on the table or on the bookshelf.
Joe is extremely talented yet somewhat arrogant.
(No comma is needed because phrases are being joined, not independent clauses.)


A FREE Activity

After going through the anchor chart, you can have students write their own compound sentences on this fan. If you want, you can have students make a craftivity out of it. After students write their sentences and you check them over, they can color the fans, cut them out, and glue them to a sheet of construction paper. Another option is to have students cut out the fans and glue it into an interactive language notebook. To download these free printables, click HERE. 

FREE Coordinating Conjunctions Craftivity- Help students remember the coordinating conjunctions by using the FANBOYS acronym. FREE Compound Sentences Craftivity- Help students remember the coordinating conjunctions by using the FANBOYS acronym.
                                 Front of Project                         Back of Project

If you are looking for additional resources for teaching about compound and complex sentences to your upper elementary students, feel free to check out the following resource. I have placed my bundle image here, but all of these items are also available for individual purchase in my TpT store.


Simple, Compound, and Complex Sentences Activities- a PowerPoint, task cards, a game, a craftivity, and more!

Thanks for stopping by!

Deb

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Punctuating Titles: An Anchor Chart and a FREEBIE

Do you teach students how to punctuate titles? It's a 5th grade standard (L.5.2.d), but in the past, I definitely touched on the more common rules (books, chapters, poems, songs, magazines, & articles) when I taught fourth grade, as well.

Today I am going to show you the anchor chart I created to address this standard. Before class, I will create the base of the anchor chart- a simple T-chart. I will be creating most of the anchor chart during class with students. (I used clip art images that are free on TPT, just in case you want to replicate this anchor chart. To obtain the pie clip art, visit Kari Bolt's store. To download the free computer and pencil clip art, visit Tim van de Vall's store.)
Punctuating Titles Anchor Chart | Part of a free lesson that includes a free sorting activity! Use this anchor chart activity and freebie to teach your students about when to underline titles, when to italicize titles, and when to place titles inside quotation marks.

Once class begins, I will ask my students to help me fill in the anchor chart. First, I will tell my students that when it comes to punctuating titles, there is a guiding question they can ask themselves that will help them punctuate the majority of titles: Is this a WHOLE literary work, or is this a PART of a literary work? I'll explain that whole, complete literary works are underlined, while partial literary works are placed inside quotation marks. Next, I'll list associated pairs (book and chapter, for example), and I'll have students tell me in which column each literary piece should be written.
Punctuating Titles Anchor Chart | Part of a free lesson that includes a free sorting activity! Use this anchor chart activity and freebie to teach your students about when to underline titles, when to italicize titles, and when to place titles inside quotation marks.

After we've listed all of the titles that follow the whole vs. parts guideline, I will tell my students that there are a few items that need to be added to the column of titles that need to be underlined. After switching to a green marker, I will add the additional four items to the bottom of that column. Likewise, I will add a couple items to the bottom of the quotation mark list. These items written in green don't really follow the whole vs. parts rule, and simply need to be memorized.

To complete the anchor chart, I will tell my students that there is one more important rule they need to remember, and it's related to the two images at the bottom of the anchor chart. After allowing 1 or 2 students to make a guess, I will jot the final rule on the anchor chart. When the anchor chart is complete, it will look like this:
Punctuating Titles Anchor Chart | Part of a free lesson that includes a free sorting activity! Use this anchor chart activity and freebie to teach your students about when to underline titles, when to italicize titles, and when to place titles inside quotation marks.

If you don't have time to make the anchor chart, you might want to consider purchasing my Punctuating Titles PowerPoint. Slides 4 through 16 take the students through a similar part vs. whole exercise. It also makes the same point about italicizing instead of underlining when you are using a keyboard. Furthermore, it concludes with 17 practice sentences.
Punctuating Titles PowerPoint! This PowerPoint teaches students when to underline, when to italicize, and when to use quotation mark. It includes a companion handout!

Whether you choose to use the anchor chart or the PowerPoint, be sure to download this FREE PRINTABLE by clicking on the image below! I plan to use it as a quick exit ticket. This sorting activity will allow you to check for understanding.
Punctuating Titles FREEBIE- Grab this sorting activity that can be used as an exit ticket! Students differentiate between when to underline/italicize titles, and when to put titles in quotation marks.

Thanks for stopping by! 



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Punctuating Titles Free Lesson| This lesson includes an anchor chart idea and a free sorting activity! Use this anchor chart activity and freebie to teach your students about when to underline titles, when to italicize titles, and when to place titles inside quotation marks.


An Adverbs Read Aloud and FREE Activity!

Hello! It's my turn to write today's blog post at Upper Elementary Snapshots, my collaborative blog. I blogged about my experience helping my daughter grasp the concept of adverbs. That blog post features an adverbs anchor chart and free follow-up activity, so I encourage you to take a moment to hop over there and check it out! (At the bottom of this post, you'll find a link that will transport you directly to the blog post containing the anchor chart.)

Before you check it out, though, I have one additional adverbs activity that I want to share with you. When I was researching adverbs, I found this AMAZING picture book that focuses on adjectives and adverbs! I don't know about you, but I love reading picture books to upper elementary students, especially when they help me target a specific skill in an engaging way! (Full disclosure: This blog post contains an Amazon affiliate link.)

The Book Introduction

The book I found is called The Big Problem (and the Squirrel Who Eventually Solved It): Understanding Adjectives and Adverbs by Nancy Loewen.
Use this read aloud to teach your students about adverbs and how they are used in sentences! This blog post contains an adverbs lesson idea and free printables!

It is somewhat hard to see in these photographs, but the author used a red font on every single adjective in the book, and a green font for each adverb.
Use this read aloud to teach your students about adverbs and how they are used in sentences! This blog post contains an adverbs lesson idea and free printables!

Use this read aloud to teach your students about adverbs and how they are used in sentences! This blog post contains an adverbs lesson idea and free printables!


HOW I INTEND TO USE THE BOOK IN A GRAMMAR LESSON!

This book presents the perfect opportunity to help students understand why an adverb is an adverb. The adverbs are already identified, leaving plenty of time to analyze each sentence and determine which word is being modified by each adverb, and how it is modifying the other word.

I recommend printing the two printables (shown below) back-to-back, so that it's on one sheet of paper, and then handing out a sheet to each student. 
Adverbs recording charts! Use these charts along with a read aloud book with plenty of adverbs.

I intend to use the document camera to project the book so that every student can read the pages along with me (silently) as I read them aloud. At the end of each page, identify the adverbs, one at a time, and have your students name the chart to which the adverb belongs. To do this, they must identify which word is being modified by the given adverb, and whether that word is a verb, adjective, or other adverb. If the word is a verb, they must also determine how that adverb is modifying the given verb. 

When you have finished the book, your  students' papers should look like this: 
Use this read aloud to teach your students about adverbs and how they are used in sentences! This blog post contains an adverbs lesson idea and free printables!

Teach your students about adverbs and how they are used in sentences by reading the book The Big Problem by Nancy Loewen. This blog post contains an adverbs lesson idea and free printables!
One of the things I love about this book and activity is that it shows that many adverbs do not end in -ly! Also, students are required to truly analyze the use of each adverb in the sentence! Furthermore, this book can also be used to identify adjectives... but that's another blog post! :)

If you happen to be looking for a few more ready-to-go adverb resources to use in your classroom, feel free to check out my TpT store. The image below shows the materials I created for teaching students about adverbs. If you click on the image, you'll be taken to the bundle in my store. From there, you can also check out each individual adverb resource, as well.



Have a great day!



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Use this read aloud to teach your students about adverbs and how they are used in sentences! This blog post contains an adverbs lesson idea and free printables!