Resources that Give Support to ELLs


Resources that Support English Language Learners- This blog post describes 4 strategies that are known to work with ELLs. Plus, examples of each are provided. Links to freebies, too!

English language learners have always held a special place in my teaching heart. Perhaps it's because my own grandfather, orphaned at the age of 9, immigrated to the United Stated without knowing a single word of English. My grandfather passed away when I was in high school, so unfortunately I cannot ask him about his experiences as an ELL in America. Whenever I meet a newly-arrived ELL, however, I think of my grandfather as a 9-year-old, and try to be the most compassionate teacher possible... the type of teacher I hope my grandfather had when he arrived to the United States.

When I plan lessons with my ELLs in mind, I focus on these two words: comprehensible input. Comprehensible input means that students can understand the information that is being presented to them, even if they don't understand every word in isolation. Therefore, comprehensible input does not rely on teacher talk alone, but almost always provides visual supports to accompany the teacher talk. When teachers use some sort of visual support as they are talking, ELLs are able to grasp concepts even though they might not understand every single word that the teacher said. Today I'm going to share examples of resoures that provide comprehensible input, and explain why they work with ELLs at certain levels.

#1- USE OF VISUALS

Which ELL levels do visuals benefit? They benefit all ELL levels, but especially Level 1 students.
When visuals are used, even students with very little English vocabulary can participate in activities. Let's use my nonfiction text feature foldable as an example. As you can see, a visual example is provided with each text feature presented. If you are leading your students in a nonfiction text feature scavenger hunt where students are perusing books trying to track down examples of each text feature, ELLs who have access to this visual-filled foldable can refer to it as needed, allowing them to participate fully in the activity.
Nonfiction Text Feature Foldable- An example of an ELL-friendly activity

#2- USE OF GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS

Which ELL levels do graphic organizers benefit? They especially benefit intermediate ELLs.
Graphic organizers help ELLs because they present written information in a visual format. When ELLs can see information presented in an organized and predictable fashion, their ability to comprehend the information increases signficantly. For example, when I teach students about informational text structures (which is a notoriously difficult concept for many upper elementary students), I rely heavily on graphic organizers. My PowerPoint, flipbook, worksheets, and craftivity all utilize the same graphic organizers.
Nonfiction Text Structure Craftivity- Nonfiction Text Feature Foldable- An example of an ELL-friendly activity that uses graphic organizers!


#3- USE OF STUDENT-FRIENDLY ANALOGIES

Which ELL levels do analogies benefit? They especially benefit intermediate ELLs.
When you think for a moment of the many academic terms being mentioned to ELLs during one school day, it's easy to understand why ELLs can become confused, and why long-term retention can be a struggle for many ELLs. In 2012, I created my first craftivity in an effort to help my students retain what they had just learned about author's purpose. I was co-teaching in a 5th grade classroom, and the students (both ELL and non-ELL) loved doing this activity. Best of all, I found that it was super effective in helping my students remember the five types of author's purpose long after the unit had been completed. So began my love affair with craftivities as effective teaching tools! It was hard to select just two, but I managed to choose two favorites to show you.
Main Idea Craftivity- An example of an ELL-friendly activity that uses a student-friendly analogy to boost comprehension and retention!
Using the ice cream cone analogy to teach main idea (shown on the cone) & supporting details (listed on the scoops of ice cream) provided my students with a concrete memory to attach to a somewhat-abstract academic term. To complete this activity, students had to match each detail scoop to the correct cone, and then glue everything together.
Themes in Literature Craftivity- An example of an ELL-friendly activity that uses a student-friendly analogy to boost comprehension and retention!
Before creating this craftivity, when I would ask students what the theme of the story was, a handful of students would stare at me blankly... even though we had covered the topic in-depth. After creating and completing this craftivity, though, that never happened again. I believe doing this theme-filled cupcake craftivity helped my students remember that theme refers to the hidden message of the story, just as creme is hidden within a creme-filled cupcake!

#4- Use of Cooperative Learning or Partner Activities

Which ELL levels do partner activities benefit? They benefit all ELLs, but for different reasons.
If you are lucky enough to have another student in the class who speaks the same language as a newly-arrived ELL, cooperative learning activities can be valuable because the one student can translate and/or clarify for the newly-arrived ELL. Cooperative learning activities are also powerful for intermediate ELLs. Many ELLs feel uncomfortable speaking up in front of the entire class, but a smaller group often seems less intimidating. In order to become fully proficient in a language, students need to be given opportunities to USE the academic language they are learning, and this is often best accomplished through a small group or partner activity.

My favorite resources to meet this need are my partner plays because they target so many skills. First of all, their primary purpose is to help build reading fluency. Since students are reading with one other person, they rarely get nervous about reading aloud, and they have plenty of opportunities to read and improve their fluency. Also, they feel comfortable asking their partner questions if they don't understand a word or phrase. After they are finished reading the play, the partners can often complete a follow-up comprehension worksheet together, allowing them many opportunities to converse while using academic vocabulary. (Note: Some of my 2nd/3rd grade sets do not include follow-up questions. Students can use this free set of questions with those scripts that don't yet contain follow-up questions.)
Partner Play Scripts- An example of an ELL-friendly activity that focuses on fluency and discussion.
This particular set also features the added bonus of integrating science content! When discussing answers, students have an opportunity to use academic science vocabulary.


If you'd like to try out a partner play and/or craftivity for FREE, click on the following images:
FREE Partner Plays to improve fluency! Scripts for 2nd through 5th grade students!  FREE Adjective and Adverb Craftivity


Feel free to check out my related Pinterest board full of other resources that give!

I'd love to hear any ideas you have for creating comprehensible input for your ELLs. Please comment below. Thanks for stopping by!

Resources that Support English Language Learners- This blog post describes 4 strategies that are known to work with ELLs. Plus, examples of each are provided. Links to freebies, too!

  

Notice and Note Signposts: FREE task cards with passages!

A few months ago, a teacher wrote to me and asked me to consider creating Notice and Note task cards. She said that her entire school district would be implementing these strategies this year. Because I was already intrigued by these signposts (ever since I ran across some photos on Pinterest!), this email provided the incentive I needed to finally order and read the book, Notice and Note: Strategies for Close Reading by Kylene Beers and Robert E. Probst.
FREE Notice and Note Posters and Task Cards! This blog post includes resources and passages to supplement the strategies outlined in the book Notice and Note by Beers and Probst.

In researching this project, Beers and Probst read and reread 50 of the most commonly taught novels in grades 4-10, looking for signposts- certain features that occurred in nearly every book across all fiction genres. The six features they identified are showcased in these free posters:
Contrasts and Contradictions- This blog post includes 6 free signpost posters and 12 passages!Aha Moment- This blog post includes 6 free signpost posters and 12 passages!Tough Questions- This blog post includes 6 free signpost posters and 12 passages!

Words of the Wiser- This blog post includes 6 free signpost posters and 12 passages!Again and Again- This blog post includes 6 free signpost posters and 12 passages!
After the signposts were identified, the authors crafted anchor questions that students could ask themselves once they spotted a signpost. These open-ended questions (listed at the bottom of my posters) require deep thinking, and they often call for students to dive back into the text to find evidence that justifies their answers.

Are you interested in introducing your students to these signposts and anchor questions? I highly recommend you read the book! In my opinion, it is well worth the money, as it contains 6 well-crafted classroom-tested lessons that you can use to introduce the signposts to your students! Beyond that, it was a very enjoyable read, and it even includes a 70-page appendix full of supplemental materials like reading logs, bookmarks, signpost printables, and book excerpts! Just click on this image (which includes an Amazon affiliate link) to check out the book.
Notice and Note by Beers and Probst: This blog post contains free supplemental materials to accompany these strategies!

After finishing the book, I created the following task cards. Just click on the image below to download them! My intention is for these task cards to be used as a review activity after all of the signposts have been individually introduced.

FREE Notice and Note Posters and Task Cards with reading passages! This blog post includes resources and passages to supplement the strategies outlined in the book Notice and Note by Beers and Probst.

This task card set contains 12 passages arranged as the task card shown above. Each passage is followed by a 2-part question. For Part A, students are required to identify the signpost that was featured in the passage. For Part B, students are charged with answering the anchor question that accompanies the signpost that they identified. (In their book, Beers and Probst stress that the anchor questions should become internalized, so that students are asking themselves the questions, rather than the teacher asking the anchor chart questions to the students. Therefore, I didn't include the anchor question in the Part B task. Besides that, it would give away the answer to Part A!)

I included an answer sheet, but please remember that the answers shown are only possible answers. As long as students write a plausible answer that refers back to the text, I will accept it as correct. Also notice that for certain passages, students might identify a different signpost. For example, for Task Card 7, I believe that "Words of the Wiser" is clearly the featured signpost. However, I realize that some students might identify it as a "Memory Moment". If this happens, I plan to tell these students that I know a memory is mentioned in this passage, but that another signpost is featured a bit more prominently, and I would ask them to reread the passage to see if they could determine which other signpost is featured.
FREE Notice and Note Posters and Task Cards with reading passages! This blog post includes resources and passages to supplement the strategies outlined in the book Notice and Note by Beers and Probst.

I hope you and your students are able to use these supplemental Notice and Note resources!
FREE Notice and Note Posters and Task Cards! This blog post includes resources and passages to supplement the strategies outlined in the book Notice and Note by Beers and Probst.

Thanks for stopping by!

Text Structures: A Lesson for Upper Elementary Students

Informational text structures... this was the ELA topic that scared me the most when I was coteaching in upper elementary classrooms. In fact, I wrote another blog post a couple of years ago describing how I decided to tackle the topic, and listing the three key components to include when teaching nonfiction text structures. (Click here to check it out.)

The purpose of this blog post is to share a complete text structures lesson with you. To be completely honest, I've received such positive, thoughtful feedback about my free character traits lesson, that I decided to create a similar text structure lesson for my followers, too!  If you read through this post, and decide that you want to try this activity with your students, be sure to click on the following image. Everything you need for this lesson is FREE! (Well, almost everything… you’ll have to provide your own anchor chart paper and clipboards! :))
Teach text structures with this nonfiction text structure anchor chart and FREE sorting activity! Ideal lesson for the upper elementary classroom that includes 8 free passages!

I would plan to do this lesson about halfway through my text structure unit. (I would show students my PowerPoint and work through my flipbook before this lesson would take place. By doing these activities first, students should have all of the prior knowledge necessary to fully participate in this review lesson.) I would prepare for this lesson by drawing the base of my text structure anchor chart (the rows and columns would be drawn, and I would have the left column already labeled). I would also have the passages printed, the interactive notebook copies printed, and the clipboards ready to go.

To begin the lesson, I would share the unfinished anchor chart with students and follow these steps:

  1.  Hold up one of the images, and ask students to tell me which row it belonged in. 
  2.  Glue the first image in place. 
  3.  Ask students to help me think of a guiding question for that text structure that I could place in  the middle column.
  4.  Instruct students to turn to a partner and list some of the signal words we have learned for that  text structure.
  5.  Tell students that I'm going to jot down a few of the words I heard mentioned during the  partner conversations that just took place, and do so beside the image (as shown).
  6.  Repeat the previous five steps with the other four text structures.
Teach text structures with this nonfiction text structure anchor chart and FREE sorting activity! Ideal lesson for the upper elementary classroom that includes 8 free passages!
The next component of this lesson includes these five clipboards. As you can see, each clipboard is labeled with the name of a text structure and its matching graphic. I also assigned a number to each clipboard.

Teach text structures with this FREE sorting activity that features 8 nonfiction passages! Ideal text structure lesson for the upper elementary classroom that includes an anchor chart!
The incredible text structure clipart is by Aim Less Daze.
Teach text structures with this FREE sorting activity that features 8 nonfiction passages! Ideal text structure lesson for the upper elementary classroom that includes an anchor chart!
I would tell students to listen carefully as I read aloud a passage. (I would also use a document camera to display the passages so my students could follow along.) Students need to match the passage to the correct text structure. To make sure everyone remains engaged, I would instruct students to display each answer by holding up fingers… 1 finger for description, two fingers for sequence, three fingers for compare and contrast, etc. After asking a few students to justify their answer (hopefully by using some of the language from our anchor chart), I would clip the passage onto the correct clipboard. Once all eight passages have all been classified, your clipboards will look like this:
Teach text structures with this FREE sorting activity that features 8 nonfiction passages! Ideal text structure lesson for the upper elementary classroom that includes an anchor chart!

Finally, I would have my students add the following clipboard images to their reading notebooks. Students can refer to the anchor chart as they write the guided question under each clipboard.
FREE Nonfiction Text Structures Interactive Notebook Entry! This blog post contains a COMPLETE informational text structure lesson with and anchor chart and 8 free nonfiction passages for your upper elementary students to sort, also!
(Notice that only the top of each clipboard is glued in place, allowing it to be flipped up and written beneath.)
FREE Nonfiction Text Structures Interactive Notebook Entry! This blog post contains a COMPLETE informational text structure lesson with and anchor chart and 8 free nonfiction passages for your upper elementary students to sort, also!

If you are looking for additional resources for teaching text structures to your upper elementary students, feel free to check out the following resources. The entire bundle shown below is currently priced at $8.99, or each individual item is available for purchase, as well.
Nonfiction Text Structure Bundle of Activities: Everything you need (and possibly more!) for 4th-6th grade text structure unit!

Thank you for stopping by today! 



An A From Miss Keller Freebies: A Mentor Text for Writing Personal Narratives


 Hello! Welcome to our fall mentor text link up! The book I chose to feature is An A From Miss Keller by Patricia Polacco. If you’re like me (and most intermediate level ELA teachers I know!), you’re already a fan of her work. This is one of her newer books, just published in 2015. Full disclosure: this blog post contains affiliate links. :)
Personal Narrative Checklist Anchor Chart... a writing lesson and FREE printables are also included!
Click on the image to take a peek at this book on Amazon!

An A From Miss Keller is a perfect mentor text to use during a personal narrative unit in writing. After all, this book IS a personal narrative. Polacco writes about the pride and fear she felt when she realized that she would be in “Killer Keller’s” writing class. Just as a fan of Patricia Polacco might expect, this book is fun to read aloud, full of descriptive sentences. One of my favorite lines from this book is “She stood stiff and erect, but when she was at her desk, she reminded me of a bird of prey, perched on a dead limb, ready to swoop down on one of us.”

A quick summary: No matter how hard Trisha tries, there just seems to be no way to impress Miss Keller, her writing teacher. Miss Keller critiques each one of her student’s writing, leaving Trisha and her classmates feeling discouraged. Trisha’s neighbor, known as Pop, recalls how his sons once had Miss Keller as a teacher, and offers words of encouragement. Still, Trisha can’t seem to make Miss Keller happy. One day, Trisha is positive that she finally nailed her writing assignment, but Miss Keller tells Trisha that she lacks emotional connection in her writing. Devastated, Trisha visits Pop, who tells Trisha about how his son became a journalist and won a Pulitzer Prize for reporting, and he credited Miss Keller for helping his son become a gifted writer. Shortly thereafter, Pop dies unexpectedly, and Trisha is heartbroken. She pours her heart into writing a piece about Pop as her term essay. Finally, Miss Keller is moved by Trisha’s writing, and tells Trisha that she wrote a stunning tribute to Pop the crowning example of a personal narrative.

BEFORE READING

I plan to use this mentor text during the week when I focus on Elements of a Personal Narrative. Before reading this book aloud, I will create the following anchor chart with my students. (We will have already focused on numbers 1, 2, and 3 in previous weeks, and I'm confident that we will have at least briefly touched on numbers 4, 5, and 6.) 

Prior to class, I will have the title printed across the top of the anchor chart, the lines drawn, and the visual cues ready to go. I'll begin the lesson by saying something like, "We've already learned several elements of a strong personal narrative. Turn to a partner and see how many the two of you can name." After giving students two minutes to discuss the topic, I'll randomly choose some students to share their answers. 

As students list the elements, I'll add them (and the visual cues) to the anchor chart. If students fail to mention any or all of the last three elements, I plan to say, I'm going to add a few more elements that we will really dive into within the next few weeks. Right now, though, I'm just going to give you a 'sneak peek' at them, because they are important elements to have on our personal narrative checklist." (Then, when we actually do reach these lessons in future weeks, we can discuss how we've already been introduced to these elements, and we can refer back to our anchor chart!)

Following our discussion, the anchor chart will look like this:

Personal Narrative Checklist Anchor Chart... a writing lesson and FREE printables are also included!

DURING READING

Next, I will display the book. I'll tell students that as they listen to the story, they will need to follow along and listen for evidence of how Patricia Polacco included these six elements in her personal narrative. After reading, we will fill in the final column of our anchor chart with evidence from this text that proves Polacco met the requirements of a strong personal narrative. (If they want to jot down notes on a sheet of notebook paper, they may certainly do so!)
Strong Personal Narratives: A Mentor Text Writing Lesson! After reading aloud the book, you and your students can work together and find text evidence to support each element!

After we reach the conclusion, I will hand out the printable checklist, and point out how I reworded the middle section just a bit to be more specific. Together, we will go through each row on the checklist and answer the question. For most of the rows, we'll need to dive back into the book and find specific evidence. When we do this, I'll place the book below the document camera so all students will be able to read along. When we find evidence, I'll record it on the anchor chart while students write it on their own checklist. The finished anchor chart will look similar to the one below: 
Personal Narrative Checklist Anchor Chart... a writing lesson and FREE printables are also included!
Having trouble reading the words? Just download the free printable and check out page 3! The same words are printed there.


AFTER READING

I anticipate referring to this anchor chart often as we progress through our personal narrative unit. I also created the following checklist for students to use as a writing or revising tool. They can use this checklist to analyze their own writing to make sure they included all of the necessary personal narrative elements. I'm also excited to use this as a tool during writing conferences to facilitate conversation with my young authors!
FREE personal narrative checklist for writers in grades 3-6! Students can use this checklist to analyze their own personal narratives!

If you would like to replicate this lesson for your own classroom, feel free to download the printables here! I've included both checklists, an answer key, and the visual cue images in case you want to replicate the anchor chart. CLICK ON THE IMAGE BELOW FOR THE FREE PRINTABLES!
Personal Narrative Checklist Anchor Chart... a writing lesson and FREE printables are also included!


Thanks for stopping by today! I invite you to hop around from blog to blog to find some more great mentor text lessons! 



Genre Activities... FREE Printables!

One of my goals for the first month of school has always been to get to know my students as readers. I want to know what types of books interest them, and which books bore them, and then I use this information to recommend certain books to my students throughout the year. These discussions pop up naturally when we review the genres with our students... everyone seems to want to share whether or not they enjoy reading a certain genre. Therefore, genre is a topic I dive into early in the school year with as many engaging and meaningful activities as possible! Today, I am going to share three genre activity ideas with you!
Looking for genre activities to engage your upper elementary students? This blog post contains a genre anchor chart plus two more genre activities! Free printables, too!

Activity #1- Anchor Chart

This is a second-day activity in my classroom, because I use my Genre PowerPoint on Day #1 to introduce the topic. To prepare for this anchor chart activity, three things need to be done in advance. First, I make the anchor chart "base", which looks like this:
Genre Anchor Chart
Second, I print my definition phrases on sticky notes. (Click on the image below to download these free phrases. There are instructions listed for printing on sticky notes, or check out Courtney's blog post if you would like to see a tutorial with photos.)
Genre anchor chart sticky notes- plus two more free activities!
The third and final preparation task is to print a genre response sheet for each student. (You can download this free sheet also, by clicking on the image below.) This sheet is super important, because it keeps EVERYONE engaged in the entire lesson! I print the sheets on cardstock and slip them into a reusable dry-erase pocket or a page protector sleeve. (After our genre unit is complete, I gather them, and store them away so that they are ready to use again next year.)
Genre Identification Activity for the upper elementary classroom- plus two more free activities!
When it's time to begin the lesson, I hand each student a genre response sheet, a dry-erase marker, and an eraser. Then, I read one of the sticky notes, and tell students to circle the genre they think is being described. After a short discussion, we place the sticky note in the correct area of the anchor chart, and we move on to the next sticky note. Throughout the lesson, I'm making notes on a clipboard, marking which students are having difficulty, and which genres are the most confusing for students. As a result, this activity serves as a formative assessment! When we have finished, our anchor chart looks like this:
Genre anchor chart and free printables!

Activity #2- Identifying Genres

Minimal preparation is required for this activity. I only need to visit the school library (or classroom library) and check out a wide variety of books. I aim to pick out a few for each genre.
Genre activities for the upper elementary classroom! Free printables!
Add caption
Students will once again use their genre response sheets, dry-erase marker, and eraser. To begin, I simply display a book, and read its title. I also read the blurb on the back or share a short "teaser" that provides clues as to what genre the book belongs to. Again, students circle the genre  that they think the book belongs to on their response sheet, and then we have a short discussion to reveal the answer.
Genre activities for the upper elementary classroom- free printables are included!

Activity #3- Genre Minibooks

The only thing I need to do to prepare for this third activity is gather some old Scholastic book order forms and a sheet of blank white paper for each student. (Also, if you don't know how to make a tiny 8-page mini book, check out this one-minute video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21qi9ZcQVto )

After guiding students on how to form their mini book, they write "Genres" on the cover of their mini book while I distribute a book order form to each student. I instruct my students to find as many different genres in the book order as possible. When they find a book that belongs to a genre, they cut out the image and glue it to one of the pages of their mini book. After the image is glued in place, students need to label the genre they found.
Genre sorting activity for the upper elementary classroom- plus two more free activities!

If you are looking for additional genre activities, feel free to check out the following resources in my TpT store:
Genre PowerPoint- introduce your students to 14 genres. Lots of opportunities to practice identifying genres!

Genre Book Display Craftivity- students identify 12 genres... great bulletin board idea!
I used this craftivity with 4th and 5th grade students. If you want to see the one I used with third grade students, click here.

I hope some of the activities I shared will be helpful to you as you and your students explore genres this year. Thanks for stopping by!

What Do Authors Do: A Mentor Text for Writing! (Includes a sequencing freebie!)

I discovered a new picture book recently. Well, it isn't really a new book, but it was new to me! It was actually published back in 1997 (which was the year I student taught!). I wish I would have found it back in 1997, because I would have used it every year for the past 19 years! Perhaps you've heard of it, or have even used it in your classroom... (An Amazon affiliate link follows.)

Looking for a mentor text to use in a writing lesson for upper elementary students? This text can be used as a foundation to stress tons of truths about how "real" authors write.

What Do Authors Do? is by Eileen Christelow. You may recognize her name from the popular Five Little Monkeys picture book series. This book is written in cartoon form, and it follows two authors through the writing process, from the moment they get an idea and all the way through the arduous writing process and publishing process. Both authors get an idea when one of their pets chase the other one into a lake. The male author decides to write a chapter book, while the female author chooses to write a picture book.

When I found this book, the teacher in me immediately thought, Oh my goodness! This is the perfect book to share with students as part of a writing minilesson! As an ESL teacher who co-taught in many upper elementary classrooms, I wish I had a dime for every time I reminded a student that real authors revise their writing over and over, and that as authors, they needed to be willing to revise their initial drafts, too. This book provides proof of the revision process for authors in a kid-friendly way.
Looking for a mentor text to use in a writing lesson for upper elementary students? This text can be used as a foundation to stress tons of truths about how "real" authors revise. Includes a free printable!

Some of the other key points I would stress during a read aloud include:
Looking for a mentor text to use in a writing lesson for upper elementary students? This text can be used as a foundation to stress tons of truths about how "real" authors write. Includes a free printable!
This page could serve as a springboard to make a list of things students could do when they feel stuck in writing!

Looking for a mentor text to use in a writing lesson for upper elementary students? This text can be used as a foundation to stress tons of truths about how "real" authors write. Includes a free printable!
This is one of my favorite pages! I like how it shows that authors get emotionally attached to their writing, and that it can be difficult to hear negative feedback. Best of all, though, is how Eileen Christelow stresses that authors are persistent people... they DO NOT GIVE UP!

Looking for a mentor text to use in a writing lesson for upper elementary students? This text can be used as a foundation to stress tons of truths about how "real" authors revise and edit. Includes a free printable!
I would encourage students to connect this to the writing process that occurs in the classroom. When the author meets with an editor, who suggests ways to make the story better, it reminds me of how students meet with teachers during a writing conference for the same reason! 
Another fabulous feature about this book is how it does not end when each author receives an acceptance letter from the publisher. Rather, it takes the reader through the publishing process, which includes working with editors and designers, dedicating the book, and seeing how books are printed and bound by machines.
Looking for a mentor text to use in a writing lesson for upper elementary students? This text can be used as a foundation to stress tons of truths about how "real" authors revise and edit.

Finally, I love how the book ends... with the authors thinking about ideas for their next book.

Don't you love it when you can get two uses out of ONE book? When I first read this book, I knew immediately that I wanted to use it as a writing minilesson to show students how real authors work through the writing process. However, it quickly struck me that this could serve as a dual-purpose lesson! Not only could I focus on the writing process, but I could also make this a sequencing activity! Click here or on the image below to download the FREE sequencing strips!
Read aloud What Do Authors Do?, and then have your upper elementary students sequence the story-writing process using this FREE printable!


Looking for a mentor text to use in a writing lesson for upper elementary students? This text can be used as a foundation to stress tons of truths about how "real" authors write. A free sequencing activity is also included in this blog post!
Pin this activity for later!!